Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Bonobo for its complete
description of Bonobo intelligence, behavior, and culture.

Bonobo
The Forgotten Ape
By Frans De Waal and Frans Lanting

Bonobo (1997) - 210 pages
Bonobo at Amazon.com

Most people have never heard of the bonobo, an intriguing member of the great ape family, despite the fact that bonobos are as close to us as their much better known relatives, the chimpanzees. Scientists are only beginning to explore the social life of the bonobo. Whereas chimpanzees are known for male power politics, cooperative hunting, and intergroup warfare, bonobo society is egalitarian and peaceful. One major distinction of the bonobo seems to be sensitivity to others. Females, especially mothers, play a pivotal role. Bonobos form a gentle matriarchy, offering a provocative alternative to the male-based model of human evolution that emphasizes man the hunter and tool maker. In fact, specialists think of the bonobo as the "make-love-not-war" primate, because bonobos use an astonishing range of erotic encounters to resolve tensions. Bonobos shed an exciting new light on the role of sex in human society and overthrow established theories of the biological inevitability of human aggressiveness and the drive for power.

Now, two world-renowned experts in their fields, primatologist Frans de Waal and wildlife photographer Frans Lanting, have joined to celebrate this wonderful and little-know creature. Theirs is the first extended profile of the bonobo for the general reader. It presents the most up-to-date information on the species, including comparative data from zoo populations and from the field and interviews with leading bonobo experts. With superb full-color photo essays give rare views of bonobos in their native habitat in the remote rain forests of Zaire and also show them in the few zoos with captive populations; further illustrations in color and black-and-white, complement the text. This is a book for all primate-watchers, amateur and specialist, for anyone interested in the origin of our own species, and for those studying the evolution of gender relations.

Frans De Wall is Professor of Psychology at Emory University and Research Professor at the Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center in Atlanta. A world-renowned primatologist, he is the author of several books, including Chimpanzee Politics (1982) and Good Natured: The Origins of Right and Wrong in Humans and Other Animals (1996).

Frans Lanting is an internationally acclaimed wildlife photographer and the recipient of many prestigious awards. His work appears regularly in National Geographic, Life, and other magazines. His books include Madagascar: A World out of Time (1990). Okawango: Africa's Last Eden (1993), and Forgotten Edens (1993).

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Bonobo
The Forgotten Ape
By Frans De Waal and Frans Lanting

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Bonobo for its complete
description of Bonobo intelligence, behavior, and culture.