Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Honey Badgers not for showing us
their aggressive behavior but for showing us their intelligence.
Working together they open bolt latches wired shut. They
set up poles, pile up rocks, or whatever is available,
to get out of cages. Do chimps do this?

Honey Badgers
Masters of Mayhem

Honey Badgers (2014) - 60 minutes
Honey Badgers at Amazon.com

"Honey badger is bad ass." Those words and a corresponding video became a YouTube sensation with over 51 million hits. This relentless little creature is one of the most fearless animals in the world, renowned for its readiness to confront grown lions and terrify rhinos, and its ability to shrug of the toxic defenses of stinging bees, scorpions, and snakes. Little is known about its behavior in the wild or why it is so aggressive. Badger specialists in South Africa take on these masters of mayhem in ways that must be seen to be believed. They set out to study them, to stymie them, to rescue them, or to keep them as pets, but in the end, it's the honey badgers that always seem to come out on top because honey badgers never give up, never give in. As one of their admirers puts it, "The honey badger is so brave and so courageous and so determined that you can't help but love him!"

3-21-19 Sun bears copy each other's facial expressions to communicate
The world’s smallest bears copy one another’s facial expressions as a means of communication. A team at the University of Portsmouth, UK, studied 22 sun bears at the Bornean Sun Bear Conservation Centre in Malaysia. In total, 21 matched the open-mouthed expressions of their playmates during face-to-face interactions. When they were facing each other, 13 bears made the expressions within 1 second of observing a similar expression from their playmate. “Mimicking the facial expressions of others in exact ways is one of the pillars of human communication,” says Marina Davila-Ross, who was part of the team. “Other primates and dogs are known to mimic each other, but only great apes and humans were previously known to show such complexity in their facial mimicry.” Sun bears have no special evolutionary link to humans, unlike monkeys or apes, nor are they domesticated animals like dogs. The team believes this means the behaviour must also be present in various other species. Also known as honey bears, sun bears are the smallest members of the bear family. They grow to between 120 centimetres and 150 centimetres long and weigh up to 80 kilograms. The species is endangered and lives in the tropical forests of South-East Asia. While the bears prefer a solitary life, the team says that they engage in gentle and rough play and may use facial mimicry to indicate they are ready to play more roughly or strengthen social bonds. “It is widely believed that we only find complex forms of communication in species with complex social systems,” says Derry Taylor, also on the team. “As sun bears are a largely solitary species, our study of their facial communication questions this belief, because it shows a complex form of facial communication that until now was known only in more social species.”

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Honey Badgers
Masters of Mayhem

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Honey Badgers not for showing us
their aggressive behavior but for showing us their intelligence.
Working together they open bolt latches wired shut. They
set up poles, pile up rocks, or whatever is available,
to get out of cages. Do chimps do this?