Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Jaws of the Pacific for
showing some of the secrets of the great white shark.

Jaws of the Pacific

Jaws of the Pacific (2003) - 50 minutes
Jaws of the Pacific at Amazon.com

The secrets of the great white shark, nature's ultimate predator, have remained deep mysteries until now. Take an underwater journey with new technology that offers the first glimpse into the Jaws Of The Pacific.

Once thought to prefer coastal waters, the great white shark regularly makes Pacific Ocean crossings. Data collected by satellite transmitters attached to sharks may soon reveal the unknown locations of their birthing and mating grounds.

For the first time, you can watch the great white shark on its migration across the Pacific, during which it swims as deep as 2,000 feet and travels up to 43 miles a day. Starting at the hunting grounds off northern California, where the sharks feed on seals, they make their way south to remote Mexican islands.

Finally, according to satellite data, the sharks travel to Hawaii. The artifacts of ancient islanders provide evidence of the great sharks' presence here. Modern researchers believe the sharks may be attracted to the tropics by schools of tuna, spinner dolphins, humpback whales, and the rare Hawaiian monk seal.

8-10-18 The Meg: real Megalodon shark would eat Jason Statham for breakfast
Jason Statham’s new film The Meg looks gloriously silly and good luck to it, but it got us thinking about what its giant prehistoric shark was really like and why it died out. This week you can go to the cinema and see Jason Statham take on a giant prehistoric shark. The Meg sees the action star face off against a Megalodon, a long-extinct shark far larger than today’s great whites. The film looks gloriously silly and is expected to do well at the box office, partly because it seems to have embraced the inherent daftness of its premise. Unlike Jaws, which featured a living species of shark – albeit with an uncharacteristic taste for human flesh, rather than seal – The Meg is the Jurassic World of shark movies. That’s a good thing. Unlike Jaws, The Meg is unlikely to scare anyone out of the water or encourage a “kill them all” attitude towards sharks – many of which are threatened species in need of protection. For an extinct creature, Megalodon gets a lot of press, which gives the impression we know a lot about it. We don’t, says palaeontologist Darren Naish of the University of Southampton, UK. Pretty much all we have is teeth, which are startlingly big. “The record is 16.8 centimetres from base to tip,” says Naish. Otherwise, their bodies have not been preserved. Being sharks, their skeleton was made of cartilage rather than bone, which doesn’t fossilise. There are a few vertebrae, which were bonier than the rest of the skeleton, but that’s all.

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Jaws of the Pacific

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Jaws of the Pacific for
showing some of the secrets of the great white shark.