Sioux Falls Zoologists

"Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent!"

The mirror test is an experiment developed in 1970 by psychologist Gordon Gallup Jr. to determine whether an animal possesses the ability to recognize itself in a mirror. It is the primary indicator of self-awareness in non-human animals and marks entrance to the mirror stage by human children in developmental psychology. Animals that pass the mirror test are: Humans older than 18 mo, Chimpanzees, Bonobos, Orangutans, Gorillas, Bottlenose Dolphins, Orcas (Killer Whales), Elephants, and European Magpies. Others showing signs of self-awareness are Pigs, some Gibbons, Rhesus Macaques, Capuchin Monkeys, some Corvids (Crows & Ravens) and Pigeons w/training. (Sorry Kitty!)

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Moose for describing
moose behavior and the raising of their calves.

Moose
Life of a Twig Eater

Moose (2016) - 60 minutes
Moose at Amazon.com

High up in Canada's Rockies, by a crystal-clear lake rimmed with old-growth forest, a moose is born. At the best of times, the odds are stacked against this leggy 35-pounder surviving its first year; normally less than 50% do. But now populations across many parts of North America are in steep decline and scientists believe one of the reasons is that fewer moose calves are surviving their first year, so it has never been more important to understand what happens in the first year of a moose's life. One intrepid cameraman undertakes the challenge of following and filming a mother moose and her newborn calf for a full year in jasper National park, a rugged wilderness that covers over 4,000 square miles, to see how it grows, how it learns from its mother, and how it avoids danger. This stunningly intimate nature documentary takes viewers deep inside the world of moose to experience a mother's love and calf's first year of life in a very up close and personal way.

11-29-18 An acid found in soil may make a disease killing deer less infectious
The incurable neurodegenerative disease is crippling deer, elk and moose populations. An acid found in rich humus soil breaks down the misfolded brain proteins — called prions — that cause chronic wasting disease. When concentrations of humic acid similar to those found in soils were applied to diseased elk brain tissue, chemical signatures of the infectious prions were nearly erased, researchers report online November 29 in PLOS Pathogens. That suggests that the acid somehow degrades the warped protein, making it less infectious, says Judd Aiken, a prion disease researcher at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada. Chronic wasting disease, an incurable neurodegenerative disease, has devastated populations of deer, elk and moose across parts of North America, South Korea, Sweden and Norway. We know “that environmental sources of infectivity play a role in transmission of these diseases,” Aiken says. The twisted proteins lurk in the rotting carcasses, feces or saliva of infected animals, and eventually seep into soils. The infection spreads when deer graze in prion-contaminated areas. Previous studies have shown that soil mineralogy can influence the spread of prions, says Bryan Richards, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wis., who was not involved in the study. For example, prions easily bind to microscopic minerals such as quartz, kaolinite and montmorillonite, and can — as lab tests have revealed — stay locked in soil for years.

Moose
Life of a Twig Eater

Sioux Falls Zoologists endorse Moose for describing
moose behavior and the raising of their calves.